Writers’ Blog

Welcome to our Writers’ Blog, where different writer friends reflect on creativity and education.

classroom without creativity

We hope that you will be inspired to donate to the schools we sponsor, which are in some of the poorest corners of the world. In doing so, you will encourage a student to write as a means of self-expression and to feel more connected with the world. Come, Lift the Lid!

The Power of Acceptance: Remembering Teachers who Remember Us, by Laura Anderson Kurk

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As a child, I kicked around silently in the halls of my schools. I shuffled a lot and stayed close to the walls or the lockers. I made myself as small as I could so I didn’t encroach on another’s space. I still wake up from dreams, startled that I’m in my bed as a 40-something-year-old woman and […]






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My Teacher, by Adam Reid Sexton

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Over the summer after eighth grade, I wanted to learn how to play the xylophone. I didn’t own a xylophone, of course. And xylophones were not for rent at Frank’s, the local music store. The high school I’d be entering that autumn owned one, though, in a case like a coffin on top of a […]






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Tiny Objects, by Clifford Garstang

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Invited by the school principal to give a talk on writing, I read a story to the class of sixth graders, one about a man who travels to Mongolia on business and is shocked by the poverty he sees there. In the story, after hiring a homeless boy to be his guide around the city, the man […]






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Sonnet XXI, from Liturgia de la Voz Abandonada, by Enrique Barrero Rodríguez, translated by John Poch

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I am small, Lord. I am but loam, clay turned into a soul who yearned to steer my craft to run aground and drench myself in your coastal foam,   but reflection of another light, lowly water that yearns to be ravine or stream, but the soil waiting like a dream where a seed was […]






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Inspiring the Stories, by Jodi Ann Mullen, PhD LMHC

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Inside me there are stories. There are scary stories, fascinating stories, stories with lessons embedded in them, and there are stories that are even mysteries to me; a treasure chest in my heart that is replenished with every new experience. My challenge as a writer and storyteller is knowing which of these stories to share. How should I […]






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The Magic of Words, by Connie Mann

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There was no library in the small town where I grew up, but every other week, the Bookmobile—a big lumbering bus filled with books—lurched to a stop in our neighborhood. Those were my very favorite days. I stood at the curb, bouncing on my toes, waiting for the doors to whoosh open. Once they did, […]






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Stones Fall, Birds Fly, by Laura Maria Censabella

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Excerpt from one-act monologue play: Character: Leonardo “Lenny” Vinci, a bird-like working class man, originally from the Lower East Side of NYC. Place: Beside the highway in upstate New York. Time: The present. LENNY VINCI hitches along a sparsely traveled country highway in upstate New York. He is a small man in his 60s who […]






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Pedagogy, by Erin McGraw

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“I married him so I’d never have to look up anything again. He’d know.” Elise didn’t mean this as praise. Bill was plump with knowledge, shiny with it. “I retain things,” he said modestly, but it wasn’t hard to see the satisfaction behind his words.  He corrected people. “Actually, that isn’t how a bicameral body […]






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Lessons I Have Learned (and Teach), by Gary Garrison

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I was in D.C. last summer, working with dramatists, young and old, at the Kennedy Center. The youngest playwright was eighteen; the oldest, in advance of sixty. Living threads in this glorious human tapestry of creative energy and talent forgot their differences–in age, gender, ethnicity, and education–long enough to sit at the table, open their […]






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